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5 Must-Read Books for Students Pursuing Car Mechanics Training

Published on January 7, 2016 by in Blog, CATI
Go Like Hell tells the story of the Ford GT40’s legendary battle with Ferrari at Le Mans.

Go Like Hell tells the story of the Ford GT40’s legendary battle with Ferrari at Le Mans.

An automotive training class is much more hands-on than your average classroom. Lessons take place right in the shop, and students very literally get their hands dirty, as they learn by working on real engines. However, students shouldn’t underestimate the value of reading up on the subject as well.

There have been many great books written about cars, from the histories of iconic brands to profiles of legendary figures. For an aspiring auto mechanic, there are a rich variety of titles out there that are not only real page turners, but will enhance your mechanical knowledge too.

Read on for a preview of a few books that mechanics school students should delve into this season.

1. Go Like Hell: Motorsport History For Students in Automotive Training Programs

Motor racing can provide valuable insights for those enrolled in automotive courses about what life is like at the very top of their profession, where even the smallest mechanical detail can be the difference between winning and losing. Go Like Hell: Ford, Ferrari and Their Battle for Speed and Glory at Le Mans  by AJ Baime is the one the best racing books out there, documenting the legendary 1960s races between Ferrari’s all-conquering team and Ford’s iconic GT40 cars.  

2. Tyler Alexander: Get Extra Car Mechanics Training From A True Legend

Students in automotive training programs looking to improve their knowledge by reading about motorsport should look no further than Tyler Alexander: A Life and Times with McLaren. Alexander was an integral part of the legendary racing team from 1964 right up until 2009, working as a mechanic, engineer, and team principal, helping design some of the automaker’s greatest cars, and masterminding some of its most famous victories.

3. Form Follows Function: Teaching Mechanics Students the Art Of The Supercar

In the book Form Follows Function: The Art of the Supercar, renowned automotive photographer James Mann captures 20 great supercars, including various Aston Martins, Ferraris, and Bugattis, in gloriously simple shots. However, it is more than just a visual indulgence, as Stuart Codling provides in-depth history, technical and design analysis for each car, with some fascinating insights for auto mechanics.   

The Maserati MC12 is one of the cars featured in Form Follows Function.

The Maserati MC12 is one of the cars featured in Form Follows Function.

4. Physics For Gearheads: The Science Behind Car Mechanics Training

Automotive training schools teach students about the technical aspects of auto mechanics, but Physics for Gearheads by Randy Beikman Ph.D. looks at the scientific principles behind mechanics in even greater depth. While Beikman delves into complex equations and concepts, he does so in a way that is easily accessible for physics novices, making it a fascinating and enjoyable read.

5. Porsche – Origin Of The Species: The Evolution Of An Automotive Classic

A must-read for car mechanics training students with a taste for classic cars, Porsche- Origin of the Species by Karl Ludvigsen focuses on one car, the Gmünd coupe 356 /2-040, and uses it as a springboard to explore the history and influence of the 356, and its unique place in automotive history.

The Porsche 356 is one of the most influential cars the automotive industry has seen.

The Porsche 356 is one of the most influential cars the automotive industry has seen.

Are you interested in learning more about car mechanics?

Visit CATI for information about our automotive training programs or to speak with an advisor.

 
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